Friday, 28 September 2018

bolt

"Usain" redirects here. For the organization with the acronym "USAIN", see United States Agricultural Information Network.
The Honourable
Usain Bolt
OJ CD
Bolt se aposenta com medalha de ouro no 4 x 100 metros 1039118-19.08.2016 frz-9565 (cropped).jpg
Bolt at the 2016 Summer Olympics
Personal information
Full name Usain St Leo Bolt
Nickname(s) Lightning Bolt[1]
Nationality Jamaica
Born 21 August 1986 (age 32)
Sherwood Content, Jamaica
Residence Kingston, Jamaica
Height 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in)
Weight 94 kg (207 lb)
Sport
Sport Track and field
Event(s) Sprints
Club Racers Track Club
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)
100 m: 9.58 WR (Berlin 2009)
150 m straight: 14.35 WB
(Manchester 2009)
200 m: 19.19 WR (Berlin 2009)
300 m: 30.97 NR (Ostrava 2010)
400 m: 45.28 (Kingston 2007)
800 m: 2:07h (Kingston 2016)
Medal record
Men's athletics
Representing  Jamaica
Event 1st 2nd 3rd
Olympic Games 8 0 0
World Championships 11 2 1
World Relay Championships 0 1 0
CAC Championships 1 0 0
Commonwealth Games 1 0 0
World Junior Championships 1 2 0
World Youth Championships 1 0 0
Total 23 5 1
Association football career
Playing position Midfielder
Event 1st 2nd 3rd
100 m 6 0 1
200 m 10 1 0
4×100 m relay 7 3 0
4×400 m relay 0 1 0
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2008 Beijing 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2008 Beijing 200 m
Disqualified 2008 Beijing 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2012 London 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2012 London 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2012 London 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro 4×100 m relay
World Championships
Silver medal – second place 2007 Osaka 200 m
Silver medal – second place 2007 Osaka 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2009 Berlin 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2009 Berlin 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2009 Berlin 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2011 Daegu 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2011 Daegu 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2013 Moscow 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2013 Moscow 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2013 Moscow 4×100 m relay
Gold medal – first place 2015 Beijing 100 m
Gold medal – first place 2015 Beijing 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2015 Beijing 4×100 m relay
Bronze medal – third place 2017 London 100 m
World Relay Championships
Silver medal – second place 2015 Nassau 4×100 m relay
CAC Championships
Gold medal – first place 2005 Nassau 200 m
Commonwealth Games
Gold medal – first place 2014 Glasgow 4×100 m relay
World Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 2002 Kingston 200 m
Silver medal – second place 2002 Kingston 4×100 m relay
Silver medal – second place 2002 Kingston 4×400 m relay
World Youth Championships
Gold medal – first place 2003 Sherbrooke 200 m
CARIFTA Games
Junior (U20)
Gold medal – first place 2003 Port of Spain 200 m
Gold medal – first place 2003 Port of Spain 400 m
Representing Americas (orthographic projection).svg Americas
World Cup
Silver medal – second place 2006 Athens 200 m
Usain St Leo Bolt OJ CD (/ˈjuːseɪn/[9]; born 21 August 1986) is a Jamaican retired sprinter and world record holder in the 100 metres, 200 metres and 4 × 100 metres relay. His reign as Olympic Games champion in all of these events spans three Olympics. Due to his achievements and dominance in sprint competition, he is widely considered to be the greatest sprinter of all time.

An eight-time Olympic gold medalist, Bolt won the 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 m relay at three consecutive Olympic Games, although he lost the 2008 relay gold medal about nine years after due to a teammate's doping disqualification. He gained worldwide fame for his double sprint victory in world record times at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, which made him the first person to hold both records since fully automatic time became mandatory. Bolt is the only sprinter to win Olympic 100 m and 200 m titles at three consecutive Olympics (2008, 2012 and 2016).

An eleven-time World Champion, he won consecutive World Championship 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 metres relay gold medals from 2009 to 2015, with the exception of a 100 m false start in 2011. He is the most successful athlete of the World Championships, was the first athlete to win four World Championship titles in the 200 m and is the joint-most successful in the 100 m with three titles.

Bolt improved upon his second 100 m world record of 9.69 with 9.58 seconds in 2009 – the biggest improvement since the start of electronic timing. He has twice broken the 200 metres world record, setting 19.30 in 2008 and 19.19 in 2009. He has helped Jamaica to three 4 × 100 metres relay world records, with the current record being 36.84 seconds set in 2012. Bolt's most successful event is the 200 m, with three Olympic and four World titles. The 2008 Olympics was his international debut over 100 m; he had earlier won numerous 200 m medals (including 2007 World Championship silver) and holds the world under-20 and world under-18 records for the event.

His achievements as a sprinter have earned him the media nickname "Lightning Bolt", and his awards include the IAAF World Athlete of the Year, Track & Field Athlete of the Year, and Laureus World Sportsman of the Year (four times). Bolt retired after the 2017 World Championships, when he finished third in his last solo 100 m race, opted out of the 200m, and pulled up in the 4x100m relay final.

He is currently training with Australian football A-League club, the Central Coast Mariners as a left-winger.

Early years
Bolt was born on 21 August 1986 to parents Wellesley and Jennifer Bolt in Sherwood Content, a small town in Jamaica. He has a brother, Sadiki,and a sister, Sherine. His parents ran the local grocery store in the rural area, and Bolt spent his time playing cricket and football in the street with his brother, later saying, "When I was young, I didn't really think about anything other than sports."As a child, Bolt attended Waldensia Primary, where he began showing his sprint potential when he ran in his parish's annual national primary school meet. By the age of twelve, Bolt had become the school's fastest runner over the 100 metres distance.

Upon his entry to William Knibb Memorial High School, Bolt continued to focus on other sports, but his cricket coach noticed Bolt's speed on the pitch and urged him to try track and field events.Pablo McNeil, a former Olympic sprint athlete, and Dwayne Jarrett coached Bolt,encouraging him to focus his energy on improving his athletic abilities. The school had a history of success in athletics with past students, including sprinter Michael Green. Bolt won his first annual high school championships medal in 2001; he took the silver medal in the 200 metres with a time of 22.04 seconds.[1] McNeil soon became his primary coach, and the two enjoyed a positive partnership, although McNeil was occasionally frustrated by Bolt's lack of dedication to his training and his penchant for practical jokes.

Early competitions
Performing for Jamaica in his first Caribbean regional event, Bolt clocked a personal best time of 48.28 s in the 400 metres in the 2001 CARIFTA Games, winning a silver medal. The 200 m also yielded a silver, as Bolt finished in 21.81 s.

He made his first appearance on the world stage at the 2001 IAAF World Youth Championships in Debrecen, Hungary. Running in the 200 m event, he failed to qualify for the finals, but he still set a new personal best of 21.73 s. Bolt still did not take athletics or himself too seriously, however, and he took his mischievousness to new heights by hiding in the back of a van when he was supposed to be preparing for the 200 m finals at the CARIFTA Trials. He was detained by the police for his practical joke, and there was an outcry from the local community, which blamed coach McNeil for the incident. However, the controversy subsided, and both McNeil and Bolt went to the CARIFTA Games, where Bolt set championship records in the 200 m and 400 m with times of 21.12 s and 47.33 s, respectively. He continued to set records with 20.61 s and 47.12 s finishes at the Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships.

Bolt is one of only nine athletes (along with Valerie Adams, Veronica Campbell-Brown, Jacques Freitag, Yelena Isinbayeva, Jana Pittman, Dani Samuels, David Storl, and Kirani James) to win world championships at the youth, junior, and senior level of an athletic event. Former Prime Minister P. J. Patterson recognised Bolt's talent and arranged for him to move to Kingston, along with Jermaine Gonzales, so he could train with the Jamaica Amateur Athletic Association (JAAA) at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

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